The Sensory Lounger

Stuart Jackson, CEO of The Sensory Chair Company, and his son Joshua, who inspired the design of The Sensory Lounger

"One of the kids was on the verge of a meltdown. Then he got in it and he just calmed right down."

Keith Manbeck,

Engineering Consultant,

on the impact of The Sensory Lounger on children with sensory processing differences

Now available from Southpaw Enterprises

"We knew there had to be a better way to deliver deep touch pressure effectively and quietly."

“Our students were drawn to it. It was like they understood the calming it would provide.”

A New Solution

The Problem

Amber Englehart MOT, OTR/L
Occupational Therapist

The Sensory Lounger is a new sensory based intervention that provides rapid deep touch pressure to the lateral, medial, ventral and dorsal sides of the body at the discretion of the user. By turning and shifting into the position that is most comfortable, the Sensory Lounger provides deep touch pressure in exactly the places where it’s needed.

At the heart of the patent pending Sensory Lounger is a sophisticated diaphragm pump and inflatable air compartment system. The pump is so quiet as to be barely audible, an important factor for sensitive ears. Powering on the system allows the air compartments to inflate to a pressure that is both effective and safe. Powering off provides a slow release of pressure. A quick release valve is also provided for rapid evacuation of the air compartments.

Originally designed for children, an adult version of the Sensory Lounger has also been produced. Both versions are now available for purchase through Southpaw Enterprises.
Sensory processing disorder disrupts the way an individual responds to sensations, severely impacting daily activities and impairing quality of life. For children with autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit disorders, emotional and behavioral disorders, anxiety disorder or other developmental conditions, sensory processing differences can initiate high levels of anxiety or arousal, leading to self-stimulatory behavior, self-injurious behavior, tantrums and meltdowns. 

A growing body of literature indicates that for sensory seeking individuals, deep touch pressure interventions act as a calming or focusing agent. While numerous tools are currently available to occupational therapists to provide this kind of proprioceptive input, few of these items actually achieve high enough levels of pressure to provide a sufficient benefit.